A regulatory framework that penalizes carbon dioxide emissions would improve nuclear’s competitiveness in the US, but greater policy clarity may be required for new nuclear investments to replace shuttered facilities like San Onofre and Yankee.

Nuclear is not without its detractors, which have a laundry list of concerns, ranging from potential for terrorist attacks to safe waste disposal. And recent media commentary has been rife with stories about the end of US nuclear being nigh, often citing the the difficulty of competing with cheap natural gas in electricity generation.

Read more on Breaking Energy.


U.S. Army Set to Ban Certain Tattoos

In a culture where even soccer moms now sport tattoos and soccer-themed “tramp stamps” (click the links for some examples), the Army’s recent decision to ban all visible tattoos has prompted a “WTF?” heard round the world.

Just watch the video above.

But there’s method to the Army’s madness. This is just one small step in the service’s campaign to raise standards and discipline after it opened the floodgates to felons, high school dropouts, and other dubious recruits when it boosted its ranks at the height of the Iraq war.

Read more on Breaking Defense.

Photo: Getty

FEMEN is at it again. The Ukranian feminist group with fairly naked protest tactics, has targeted Paris fashion week. Today, two topless activists actually stormed the runway at Nina Ricci.

FEMEN has protested fashion week before–last year they demonstrated outside of Versace‘s show in February holding up signs that said “fascism = fashion,” “model do not go to brothel” and “anorexia” emblazoned under a modified Versace logo. This is the first time, though, they’ve actually managed to get past security and on to the runway. The two activists used their naked torsos as billboards; one had “model don’t go to brothels” scrawled across her stomach and breasts; the other, “fashion dictaterror.”

Read more on Fashionista.

New Yorkers of Middle Eastern descent post-9/11. The homeless in Manhattan during the Giuliani regime. Black and Hispanic people under the Stop ‘n Frisk era. All groups that have suffered intense discrimination one would not wish on their worst enemy. And yet, while many an advocacy group has stood up for the aforementioned, nary a whisper in defense has been made on behalf of a class of people who’ve arguably been the most harshly prejudged. The most victimized. The most misunderstood and abused. And since no one has cared to look beyond their exquisite breasts, toned asses, multi-million dollar wardrobe allowances, and engagement rings the size of many people’s apartments, to see past the veneer, sisters have had to do it for themselves, today, in the pages of the Post. They are the self-described Trophy Wives 2.0 and they’re here to “redefine” the term “trophy wife” as it currently appears in the Oxford English dictionary.

Let’s start with Stephanie Adams, and a story that, if you’ve got any ounce of a soul at all, will rock you to the core and have you dialing up the NYCLU faster than one can say, through tears, “My shopping trip was ruined. Ruined!”

Read more on Dealbreaker.

There’s no better way to introduce this story than by reprinting the opening paragraph of the Sixth Circuit opinion by Judge Raymond Kethledge (citation omitted):

There are good reasons not to call an opponent’s argument “ridiculous,” which is what State Farm calls Barbara Bennett’s principal argument here. The reasons include civility; the near-certainty that overstatement will only push the reader away (especially when, as here, the hyperbole begins on page one of the brief); and that, even where the record supports an extreme modifier, “the better practice is usually to lay out the facts and let the court reach its own conclusions.” But here the biggest reason is more simple: the argument that State Farm derides as ridiculous is instead correct.

Trolls. So. Hard.

Want to know the argument that set off the panel? “Like a Good Neighbor, State Farm is there… with a detailed explanation!

Read more on AbovetheLaw.

It’s difficult enough for one ship to find and sink another ship. It may not be quite as hard for planes flying from an aircraft carrier to find enemy ships and sink them, but it’s not easy. The hardest task for a plane — especially a land-based plane — may be to find a small boat and sink it while it’s moving.

But that’s just what one of America’s B-1B bombers accomplished earlier this month.

Read more on Breaking Defense.

Getty

While everyone in Hollywood was getting glammed up to go to the Emmys, putting the last style tweaks on their ballgowns and ensuring their updos and blowouts looked just right, Miley Cyrus was in Las Vegas wearing this.

As far as we can tell, it consists of: black nipple pasties, a white mesh dress, black and white underwear/bathing suit bottom (pretty sure it’s this Agent Provocateur bikini bottom) and a Yeti fur shrug.

Read more on Fashionista.

The House of Moynihan has had to cut ties with some of its own.

Read more on Dealbreaker.

On Wednesday, the Cleveland Browns traded running back Trent Richardson to the Indianapolis Colts for a 2014 first-round pick. This move, which amounts to Cleveland announcing to the world, “we took a two-week stab at 2013 and decided it’s not for us,” has the side effect of relegating Colts running back Ahmad Bradshaw to second-string status.

This is good for the Colts, maybe good for the Browns — assuming they can convert this pick into something worthwhile — and an absolute disaster if Ahmad Bradshaw played any role on your fantasy team. All of a sudden, that reliable second-tier back (though let’s be honest, he was probably never more than a decent Flex #realkeeping) is useless.

Now imagine how much worse it would be if you’d just traded a top 5 QB for a package involving Bradshaw. That’s what happened in one league and the rest of the league vetoed the trade after the real-life Richardson move. But since this league is a law school league, they prepared an appellate brief demanding the trade go through.

It’s a fun read….

Read more on AbovetheLaw.

Where do we begin? Breaking Energy featured the Russian energy business in a recent Quote of the Day and it’s not that we’re picking on the country, but the murky world of Kremlin insiders – many former KGB personnel – running oil and gas companies with shares listed on public exchanges is nothing short of fascinating.

The latest bizarre tale again features Igor Sechin – head of Rosneft and close Putin ally – who is now accused of corporate misconduct regarding Rosneft’s takeover of TNK-BP, which made it the largest “public” oil company in terms of reserves and production.

Moscow Times reports:

Read more on Breaking Energy.